A simple calculator with which you can calculate download time for a file depending on download speed. How long time it will take depends on file size, your own download speed and the server's upload speed. In these calculations it is assumed that your download speed is the bottleneck. Input the file size and click on "Calculate".

Download speed is most relevant for people who are consuming content on the Internet, and we want FAST.com to be a very simple and fast speed test. What about ping, latency, upload and other things? When you click the “Show more info” button, you can see your upload speed and connection latency (ping). There is another option under downloads that does limit your rate. Last edited by facedown; Dec 11, 2013 @ 7:30pm #6. At first my download speed was 2mb/s

Jun 01, 2017 · Didn’t work for me /: My average download speed is 3-5 MBPS. The download starts between there and then IMMEDIATELY anchors to 200kb for a few minutes, then shoots back up to 3-5 MBPS for about a minute, then shoots straight down to 200kb for a few minutes. Ran a speed test and my ping is 15, DL is 115 MBPS, and upload is 11 mbps.

Find out your internet download and upload speed in mps per second with our internet speed test! Get lightning fast internet speeds starting at 100 mps with Spectrum! So, a high download speed will allow you to load internet pages instantaneously and enjoy online video streaming without buffering. On the other hand, a low download speed will leave you with long page load times and pixelated or laggy video streams.

So with this known take your MegaBITS from you speed test (mine being 200) and divide it by eight to get the appropriate amount of MegaBYTES (mine being 25 megabytes.) So say you have 100 MB/s from your speed test your download speed should be 12.5 Megabytes per second. After doing this math if you have any other issues I'd be glad to help.

May 30, 2014 · For example, your old Windows XP computer may be rocking an 802.11b network card, in which case the theoretical maximum transfer rate will be 10 Mbps, and the practical speed will be much less. It’s not worth paying for a 50 Mbps connection if that’s going to be the bottleneck. So with this known take your MegaBITS from you speed test (mine being 200) and divide it by eight to get the appropriate amount of MegaBYTES (mine being 25 megabytes.) So say you have 100 MB/s from your speed test your download speed should be 12.5 Megabytes per second. After doing this math if you have any other issues I'd be glad to help.